TP Mechanical Earns Recertification to ISO 9001:2015 Standards

TP Mechanical, with our strong commitment to monitor and continuously improve our services and products, recently received recertification as conforming to ISO 9001:2015 standards.

International Organization for Standardization (ISO) experts from 95 countries spent three years working on revisions to ISO 9001:2008, bringing the standard up to date with current needs. The organization states that ISO 9001:2015 focuses more on performance and helps companies satisfy their customers, while providing a foundation for growth and sustained success.

What is ISO 9001:2015?

TP Mechanical’s Quality Management System was certified as conforming to ISO 9001:2015 standards. The scope of the registration is for the “prefabrication of components for the purpose of fast-track construction in the piping and mechanical plumbing fields.”

TP Mechanical uses prefabrication to reduce construction costs and shorten schedules while decreasing waste and scrap. By doing more work in the controlled environment of our shop, we enhance safety and achieve higher quality for the projects completed on the job site.

“We previously conformed to the ISO 9001:2008 standard, and we’re proud to earn our recertification,” said TP Mechanical President and CEO Bill Riddle. “This highlights how our entire team focuses on quality and discipline in our prefabrication efforts.”

What does ISO 9001:2015 mean to you?

By having a Quality Management System that conforms to ISO 9001:2015 standards, TP Mechanical demonstrates our commitment to the continuous improvement of our products and services. This dedication translates into both dependable quality and noteworthy cost savings for our customers.

 

How Our Commitment to Quality Benefits You
Improves quality and service
Reduces the amount of on-site work
Provides on-time delivery
Fosters a get-it-right-the-first-time attitude
Reduces mistakes, change orders and defects


For more information

To learn more about what our TP Mechanical team can accomplish on your next project, click here.

Is Technology Improving our Lives or Hindering Relationships?

The website www.mindbodygreen.com published an article in December 2015 by Vishnu Subramaniam, referencing technology and how it really is hindering our experiences and relationships.

technology

11 Things You Think Are Improving Your Life (But Are Actually Messing is Up)

source http://www.mindbodygreen.com  by Vishnu Subramaniam

Each year, as we continue to live larger lives with more distractions, more work, more technology, more stuff — it gets easier and easier to forget about what really matters — peace of mind, serenity, and inner joy. Instead, we keep striving to work just a bit more, to squeeze in one more happy hour, to buy one more fancy toy. More is more, right?

I propose a radical alternative to this way of thinking. I think all this stuff is standing in the way of true fulfillment. It’s a distraction. What we really need to be happier is less.

Do less. Be more.

To help you start ridding your life of superfluous accessories, commitments, and pursuits that might be keeping you from uncovering your true bliss, I’ve listed 12 things to stop accumulating this year.

It’s not necessarily about going from a mansion to a bedsit, or from a jam-packed social calendar to the lifestyle of a hermit. It’s about recognizing small opportunities for change and taking them. Little by little, that process will transform your life.

  1. Stuff

The more “stuff” you have, the more space in your mind is occupied by worries and strategies regarding those things and how to protect them. Look around your closets, your desk, your apartment, and your office. Theoretically, you could probably get rid of about 90 percent of the things you own, with the only difference you notice being all the space you suddenly have.

Any time you recognize that something in your space isn’t serving a clear purpose, donate it or toss it. Over time, you’ll streamline your space and your thinking.

  1. Multitasking

The more efficient you try to be, the more you try to multitask — a trader making phone calls while reviewing two screens on his desk is an obvious example — the less engaged you are with what’s actually happening around you. Multitasking is the enemy of focus. Turn off superfluous notifications while you’re trying to get things done. Focus on one item at a time, putting the most important things first.

Prioritize. Stop multitasking. Be present with the task at hand.

  1. Technology

Speaking of distractions, technology is the worst culprit of all — not to mention one of the most frequent stressors we deal with on a daily basis. Most of us don’t spend more than five minutes away from a screen all day.

Try turning off your technology for an hour or two. If your job requires you to be glued to a computer, turn off one piece of tech. If you really can’t do that, take half an hour to walk outside, or eat lunch somewhere with natural light. Your life should be better because of technology, not worse. And limiting superfluous interactions with it will create more space for enjoyment and inspiration in the rest of your life.

  1. Work

This doesn’t mean turning into a slacker. It means being more strategic.

We tend to fit the work given into the time allotted. Make leaving your office by a certain time each day a priority. It will force you to be more strategic in the way you use your time, and provide more time to do the things you want to do outside the office.

  1. Comparisons

It’s natural to feel the urge to compare yourself to your neighbors, your colleagues, the people you went to high school with.

Regardless of how someone else’s life looks, odds are they haven’t figured out any more than you have. You aren’t behind. You’re not doing anything wrong. Focusing on your own goals and honing strategies to achieve them is much more likely to lead to success than spending your time worrying about the progress other people are making.

It’s the best — and maybe the only — way to stay true to yourself and live an authentic life.

  1. Busyness

It’s great to be self-sufficient. But most of us devote so much time to getting ahead that we put our relationships on the back burner. We don’t prioritize family or community, though they are by far the most rewarding parts of life.

Find places you can trim your commitments in other areas and increase the amount of time you spend with family, volunteering, or working with the community. Don’t prioritize based on what seems urgent. Prioritize based on what is important.

  1. Social media

It wastes time and negatively affects self-esteem. Give yourself a daily limit for the number of visits or amount of time spent checking social accounts. Fill that time with phone calls to family or a coffee date with an old friend. (Introverts get much more satisfaction from one-on-one conversations than from superficial chatter or “small talk.”)

  1. Noise

It’s almost never silent in our world. Music in the car, open office spaces, TV for “background noise” at home. It’s even noisy in the doctor’s office and in line at the pharmacy.

Find a few minutes for quiet each day. It might feel uncomfortable at first, but you’ll grow to revel in it. You’ll be surprised how many insights you can have in even just 10 minutes of silent reflection. Notice, too, how much more peaceful you feel after just a few minutes of silence.

  1. News

Your TV, your homepage, your gas station, your iPhone — Even when you’re intentionally limiting superfluous technology use, you can’t escape up-to-the-minute news about what’s happening in the world. And most of these stories are intentionally told from angles designed to prey on your emotions. You express what you ingest. So, practice ignoring click-bait and sob stories you see and read dozens of times a day. Like with any habit, it soon won’t even require will power to just soar past.

Fill your mind with uplifting, energizing content. And if you feel like you’re missing out on a certain level of information that’s necessary to thrive in your world, give yourself a certain amount of time per day, from a news outlet you can trust, to catch up on what’s happened. Don’t let other people’s perceptions of reality overtake your life. It really does make a difference.

  1. Judgements

One of the most destructive things about the tendency to compare is a reliance on judgment of others for your own self-esteem. If our lives look “better” than someone else’s, we can assuage our own insecurities with a temporary feeling of superiority. It’s not real, and it won’t last.

Be inspired by the success of others and extend compassion to those who need it. Replace anger and hostility with empathy, compassion, and understanding.

  1. Commitments

It’s really tempting to say “yes!” to everything. Committing to too many things eventually makes you unfit for everything. Yes, investing more in your family and in yourself is a commitment. But doing that well requires you to relinquish commitments that are less important in the long run.

Why not do a few things really well instead of doing everything halfheartedly?

Ask yourself what really matters to you. What do you care about? Set fewer goals and focus your attention on the handful of things you’re really passionate about. Learn to let the rest go.

Do less. Be more.

 

3 Diets to Help You Follow the New Dietary Guidelines

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

The new 2015-2020 federal dietary guidelines focus on the prevention of diet-related chronic diseases instead of just weight management alone. Here are three suggested diets designed around the guidelines to help make them more user-friendly:

  • Healthy American Diet: A healthier version of what people in the United States typically consume, it suggests 2.5 cups of vegetables, 2 cups of fruit, 6 ounces of grain, 3 cups of dairy and 5.5 ounces of protein daily.
  • Mediterranean Diet: Heavy on protein and fruits while light on dairy, this diet suggests 6.5 ounces of protein, 2.5 cups of fruit and 2 cups of dairy daily. Like the American diet, it also suggests 2.5 cups of vegetables and 6 ounces of grain daily.
  • Vegetarian Diet: This diet only suggests 3.5 ounces of protein daily. To replace meat and seafood, it prescribes 7 ounces of nuts and seeds, as well as 8 ounces of tofu and other soy products. It also recommends 2.5 cups of vegetables, 2 cups of fruit and 6.5 ounces of grain.

*Above examples are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Diet-Guidelines

Lead Water Poisoning

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

Although lead-based paint and dust in older buildings are the most common sources of lead poisoning, drinking water is sometimes a source as well. This is mostly due to old, corroded pipes.

High levels of lead in the bloodstream can cause serious health effects, especially in children under the age of 6. Symptoms of lead poisoning in children include developmental delay, learning difficulties, irritability, weight loss, fatigue, abdominal pain, vomiting, constipation and hearing loss.

Since you can’t see, smell or taste lead in water, the only way to detect it is to have the water tested. If your home is served by public water systems, your local water authority should be able to provide this information. You can also use an at-home lead-testing kit.

If your tap water’s lead levels exceed 15 ppb, you can possibly reduce the threat of lead poisoning by doing the following:

  • Run cold water for at least a minute before using or drinking it.
  • Do not use hot tap water for drinking and cooking, since hot water draws lead from the corroded pipes. Instead, use cold tap water and heat it on the stove.
  • Invest in a home water filtration system that reduces the amount of lead in your water.
This article is intended for informational purposes only and is not intended to be exhaustive, nor should any discussion or opinions be construed as professional advice. Readers should contact a health professional for appropriate advice. © 2016 Zywave, Inc. All rights reserved.

The Numbers You Need to Know (24.7.365)

You never expect to have a mechanical breakdown. But when it does happen, TP Mechanical has you covered. Our emergency service teams are on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

If you have a leaky sprinkler, we’re there for you. If you have an air conditioner on the blink, we’re there for you. Any time you have a disruption in your mechanical systems, our experienced technicians can handle your equipment outage.

TP Mechanical Service places a priority on training for our team members. Our skilled technicians continue to develop their knowledge through continuing education programs to stay up to date on the latest diagnostic techniques and products. We promise you that our technicians are prepared to give you the answers you need accurately and efficiently.

One more number you should know: 4

That’s our guaranteed response time. When you select TP Mechanical as your service partner, our team is able to respond to your emergencies within 4 hours to troubleshoot and repair any problem.

The last numbers you should know: 800-829-1989

We hope you never have to dial this number. But don’t hesitate to call those 10 digits for any service need – not just emergencies. We understand the investment you’ve made in your facilities and how an outage can affect your operations.

TP Mechanical offers a variety of service agreement options including:

  • Service Agreements (SA)
  • Inspection Agreements (IA)
  • Maintenance Agreements (MA)
  • Total Agreements (TA)
  • Custom Agreements (CA)

To learn more about TP Mechanical’s specific agreements and which might be right for your business needs, visit our Agreements page.

Does a Safe Culture Save Money? You Bet!

TPM-SafetyFirstAlways2_1-30-13At TP Mechanical, safety is more than an item to check off our work list. Safety is part of our DNA. That’s because we value the health and well-being of everyone on our job sites. Safety First, Always First are words we truly live and work by.

While safety is important for our personnel first and foremost, it does have a significant impact on other areas of the business. United States businesses spend $170 billion a year due to work injuries and illnesses — expenses that come directly out of company profits. Having defined, effective safety and health management processes can reduce injury and illness costs by 20 to 40 percent.1

Improves productivity

Having a safe workplace also improves employee productivity and morale. Satisfied employees produce at a higher level and return to work more quickly after minor injuries or illnesses. The costs of a serious or fatal on-the-job injury are damaging: Psychological stress from an accident may require long-term counseling, and some co-workers may not be able to return to work for a significant period of time. Locating and training replacement workers takes time and decreases productivity.

Reduces workers’ compensation costs and avoids OSHA penalties

Employers and their insurers pay more than $40 billion each year in workers’ compensation, or almost $500 per covered employee.2 Businesses can partner with OSHA to reduce the costs of workers’ compensation and OSHA penalties resulting from workplace injuries and illnesses. These programs include:

  • OSHA Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP): Businesses that work with VPP have 50 percent fewer lost workday injuries than the average for their industry and incidence rates 50 percent below the national average. Companies have saved more than $1 billion partnering with VPP.1 In 2003, TP Mechanical became the first mechanical contractor in the U.S. to obtain VPP status.
  • OSHA Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP): Small businesses can participate in this program to save companies substantial amount of money. OSHA strategic partnerships and alliances help promote workplace safety and health.

Maintaining a safe workplace is especially important for cost savings in 2016. As part of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Improvements Act of 2015, OSHA is increasing fines for the first time in 25 years.

To learn more about how TP Mechanical puts safety first, visit TP Mechanical Safety.

1 Occupational Safety & Health Administration

2 American Society of Safety Engineers