Project Spotlight: Norwood Middle School Renovation for Norwood City Schools

 

The original building of Norwood Middle School, which houses students in grades 6, 7 and 8, was built over 100 years ago, in 1914. Although the school was renovated in 1965 and again in the mid-1980s, the school began another major renovation to update facilities in early 2018.

Charles Douglas, who happens to be a Norwood alumnus (‘91), serves as the onsite superintendent for TP Mechanical. The TP team, including Douglas and project manager Michael Schneider, started with demolition of the existing mechanical systems followed by new duct work and the installation of a VRV system. This project is a significant upgrade as prior to this renovation, the 148,000 square foot school building used steam radiators for heat and was without central air conditioning.

The age of the building has revealed several unknowns and challenged the team to think creatively. SHP, the architect & engineer, and Monarch Construction continue to help provide imaginative and cost-effective solutions enabling the team to stay on schedule and minimize disruptions to the occupied facility.

Currently TP Mechanical is about 80% complete on this project, with full completion of the renovation in the west wing and nearing completion of the east wing in March. Part of the project involved completing the field house during phase two—just in time for basketball season.

This was TP’s first project with Norwood City Schools; we have built strong relationships and look forward to future projects within the district. Norwood City School District has been providing quality education in the Greater Cincinnati area for more than 100 years and includes three elementary schools, one preschool and one high school in addition to Norwood Middle School.

TP Mechanical Team:

  • Project Manager: Michael Schneider
  • Site Superintendent: Charles Douglas
  • Sheet Metal Foreman: Josh Schaffer
  • Sheet Metal Team: Jacob Stauffer, Robert Gilley
  • Refrigeration Lead: Greg Porter
  • Refrigeration Team: Matt Halusek

Project Partners:

A Top-Notch Approach to Complex Renovations: Spotlight on the Enoch Grehan Building Renovation for the University of Kentucky

TP Mechanical Team:

  • Project Manager: James Randall
  • Pre-Fabrication Shop Leader: Jerry Klein and Nicole Holland
  • Site Superintendent: Greg Jordan
  • BIM Coordination Team: Kameron Bledsoe, Zack Campbell, Randy Tillet, Jeremy Hassman, Mayur Kadakia and Greg Dennison

Project Partners:

When the University of Kentucky wanted to renovate the Enoch Grehan Building in the core of academic campus, we knew it would be a complex project requiring smart scheduling.  As a testament to our impressive project partners, we are currently ahead of schedule.

We thrive on complex projects with coordination challenges, like this one. To succeed, we look to our synchronized divisions —the BIM team, self-performed pre-fabrication, off-site distribution team and our installation team— to come together and provide high-quality systems.

Our process starts with the BIM coordination team developing detailed models to ensure the pre-fab systems are built to precision.  The models are the road map, guiding system fabrications to the final connections in the field.  Once the model for Grehan was created, the fabrication team took ownership of their scope.  On this project, the Carrier system prefab saved two to three days of site work.  We also used prefabbed systems for the sewage ejector pump and the 12-amp chilled water piping serving multiple buildings. By having this piping ready to set in the tunnel in the heart of campus, we saved the university from having to shut down the area for a week.

On this project, multiple trades were on-site at once, working in the same areas. By building much of the systems off-site, we were able to avoid working in and around other contractors. Not only does pre-fab keep our on-site team safer, because they don’t have to go into small, confined or subsurface areas, it also provides a huge time savings.

Our distribution center also played a key role in keeping our scope ahead of schedule.

UK’s campus is a flurry of active construction projects.  We knew the project would come with storage limitations on site.  The ability for TP to store equipment at our distribution center until the systems were needed on site, proved to be an invaluable asset.

The University of Kentucky is known for its sophisticated approach to building renovations. This project is a wonderful opportunity to show potential higher education clients our capabilities. We are proud to be working for the University and our project team.

 

 

 

Project Feature: Pre-Fabrications Benefit Fast Track Construction

Mount Carmel Health System in Columbus, Ohio needed to expand in order to meet patient demands without interrupting current patient care. Construction on Mount Carmel East Expansion included a new 128-bed tower, featuring all individual rooms, and 11 new operating rooms. An addition to the existing chiller plant for added cooling and an addition to the boiler plant was also part of the project.

TP Mechanical stepped in to meet the challenge of working within a fully operational hospital on a tight 13-month deadline. In order to help keep the project on schedule and incur the least amount of disruption to the hospital patients and staff, the team constructed much of the needed materials off site. Fabricated hallway racks, which each included supply air ductwork, hydronic HVAC piping, VAV Box’s, Domestic water piping and electrical conduits, were all assembled, tested and inspected prior to being delivered to the site. There was even drywall assembled on to the racks off site to help save time. TP mechanical also prefabricated medical gas zone valve box assemblies.

These off-site fabrications directly impacted time savings on the project, accelerating the installation per floor by an impressive 75%.  Partners on the project were Messer Construction and NBBJ Architects. The $25,832,089 project was completed on schedule in just 13 months—thanks in a big way to the ability to build much of the design off-site.