Do You Know Seizure First Aid?

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1 in 10 people may have a seizure in their lifetime. A seizure is a change in the brain’s electrical activity that can cause a variety of symptoms, including violent shaking, falling and losing bodily control. However, because there are different types of seizures, symptoms can vary.

Knowing proper seizure first aid is important so that you can help keep a person who is having a seizure safe and prevent further injury. General seizure first aid includes the following:

  • Clear the area immediately to prevent possible injury.
  • If the person is standing, gently guide them to the floor. Roll them on their side and cushion their head.
  • Time the seizure. If the person has epilepsy and the seizure lasts longer than three minutes, call 911.
  • Call 911 if any of the following apply:
    • The person is pregnant.
    • The person has never had a seizure before.
    • The person does not regain consciousness after the seizure.
    • The seizure lasts longer than five minutes.
  • Do not attempt to hold the person down or put anything in their mouth while they are seizing. Doing so could cause injury.

For other seizure first-aid tips, please visit the CDC’s webpage.

Simple Summer Activities Your Kids Are Sure to Love

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

Summer is often filled with outdoor parties, warm weather and no school. Unfortunately, the arrival of summer can bring stress for many parents as they search for ways to keep their kids happy, healthy, engaged and safe without breaking the bank.

Listed below are a few simple—and inexpensive—summer activities that you and your children can do together this summer.

  • Make homemade frozen treats. Cooking together is a great way to create memories that will last a lifetime and to instill healthy habits in your children. Click here for some recipes to get you started.
  • Go berry picking. Many berries are in season in the summer. Take your children to your local berry farm to pick your own delicious strawberries, blackberries and raspberries.
  • Go hiking. Enjoy the summer weather and your state’s scenery, and get some exercise by taking a family hike at your nearest trail.

Tick and Tick-borne Disease Season is Here

Provided by HORAN | Presented by TP Mechanical

Experts are warning that this year’s tick season could be worse and more widespread than ever due to milder winters, booming mice and deer populations, and the 2015 abundant acorn crop. Unfortunately, with the projected increase of ticks, the threat of tick-borne disease, including the most common, Lyme disease, also increases.

The best way to avoid contracting a tick-borne disease is to practice proper preventive measures, which include the following:

  • Wear light-colored clothing, including long-sleeved shirts and pants when in wooded areas, and tuck pant legs into socks or boots. Keep long hair tied back.
  • Wash your body and clothing after all outdoor activities.
  • Look periodically for ticks if you have been outdoors, especially if you have been in wooded areas or gardens.
  • Remove ticks within 24 hours to greatly reduce the risk of contracting disease.
  • Talk with your veterinarian about tick repellent for your pet.
  • Check your pet’s coat if it has been in a possible tick-infested area.

For more information on ticks and tick-borne disease, click here.

National Fireworks Safety Month: June 1 to July 4

Provided by HORAN | Presented by TP Mechanical

Fireworks are a staple at festivities for many Americans during the summer months. Unfortunately, many people do not realize just how dangerous fireworks and sparklers can be—which is a primary reason that injuries occur.

In honor of National Fireworks Safety Month, which occurs from June 1 to July 4, take some time to familiarize yourself with the following safety suggestions to avoid accidents when using fireworks.

  • Do not shoot fireworks off if you are under the influence of alcohol.
  • Always have a hose or water bucket handy.
  • Keep spectators a safe distance away.
  • Show children how to properly hold sparklers, how to stay far enough away from other children and what not to do.
  • Never try to relight a firework that didn’t properly ignite.
  • Soak all firework debris in water before throwing it away.
  • Do not carry fireworks in your pocket or shoot them from metal or glass containers.

Shop for Seasonal Produce This Summer

Provided by HORAN | Presented by TP Mechanical

The U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion recommends that you consume at least two servings of fruit and three servings of vegetables each day. Although this varies by age, sex and level of physical activity, it is a good recommendation to live by to build a healthy dietary base.

One great way to add variety to your diet and to make sure you are eating enough fruits and vegetables is to look for seasonal produce. Additionally, choosing in-season produce can help save you money, as the abundance of the fruit or vegetable typically makes it less expensive.

This summer, be mindful of what fruits and vegetables are in season near you. Fruits & Veggies—More Matters, a health initiative focused on helping Americans increase fruit and vegetable consumption for better health, has made it easy to figure out which produce is in season. On its website, you can view year-round, winter, spring, summer and fall produce options.

Click here to see what’s in season this summer.

 

AAP Releases Updated Safe Sleep Guidelines

Presented by TP Mechnaical | Provided by HORAN

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently released new guidelines designed to help reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other types of sleep-related infant deaths, which are also known as sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUIDs). SIDS is the leading cause of death among infants between 1 month and 1 year of age, with 90 percent of SIDS cases occurring before an infant is 6 months old.

The new report suggests that:

  • Infants should sleep in the same room as their parents, but in separate beds, for at least the first six months of their lives.
  • Infants should never sleep on a soft surface, such as an armchair or couch.
  • Infants should be placed on their backs to sleep on a firm surface with a tight-fitting sheet.
  • Parents should avoid putting an infant in a crib with pillows, loose sheets, blankets or other soft surfaces.

For more information, visit the AAP’s website.


article rights

The Connection Between Office Camaraderie and Your Health

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

Getting along with your co-workers can make the task of going to work more enjoyable and, according to recent research, can actually improve your health.

The Society for Personality and Social Psychology analyzed 58 studies of more than 19,000 people from different parts of the world and published its findings in the Personality and Social Psychology Review, an academic journal. The report also explains that when individuals identify and are invested in relationships with their colleagues, workplace productivity increases, employee morale increases and burnout levels decrease.

If you have not already done so, consider taking steps toward building professional, positive relationships with your co-workers. Use the following tips to develop positive relationships with your colleagues:

  1. Be friendly and encouraging
  2. Be supportive of other people’s work
  3. Initiate conversations, repeated interactions and communications
  4. Be respectful to your co-workers and their space
  5. Participate in activities that don’t involve work
  6. Maintain a positive attitude as much as possible

Reduce Your Holiday Stress

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

The holidays can bring joy, but they can also bring stress. Whether you are worried about money, gift-giving or finding enough time to get everything done, using the following coping mechanisms can help you manage and reduce your holiday stress.

  • Get organized—Writing down the things you need to do or places you need to be can help you visualize your to-do list and make it seem much more manageable.
  • Know that it’s OK to say “no”—If attending an event that isn’t important to you will interfere with you getting work done or running errands, just say “no” politely.
  • Create and stick to a budget—Money is one of the biggest holiday stressors for people. Set a realistic budget this holiday season and don’t go over it.
  • Ask for help when you need it—You don’t have to decorate, wrap presents or cook by yourself. Ask friends or family members to help you complete these tasks.

leading-holiday-stressors