Safety Education and Communication 

Safety is not just a standard we uphold. It’s a way of life at TP Mechanical. In 2021, we hit a milestone for company safety, surpassing 7,000,000 safe man hours without a lost time accident. We welcome in 2022 with the same focus and dedication to safety – safety first, always first. 
 
Our safety training, which begins immediately after hiring, goes beyond OSHA requirements and clearly sets expectations for all team members whether they work in the office or field. When a question of safety does arise, the safety team uses the situation as an educational opportunity. The safety team has a discussion with those involved, gathering information about the circumstances and asking employees what could have been done differently to create a safer environment in the future. 
 
At TP we have an open-door policy regarding safety issues. Employees should feel empowered and comfortable to bring concerns, questions, suggestions and accolades to their superiors because they believe in our safety culture and commitment to sending each employee home to their families every night, injury free.

TP’s Service Team Invests in Safety Measures for a 20-acre Chemical Manufacturing Customer

Thanks to TP’s investment in company safety and our initiative to take safety training to the next level, our service team was awarded a sizable preventative maintenance contract for a chemical manufacturing client in Addyston, Ohio. Located on the Ohio River, the manufacturer’s 20-acre campus houses over 60 buildings, ranging from administrative spaces to large warehouses.

With a facility of this size and the environment of manufacturing chemicals, our team needed to be thoroughly prepared to safely begin work. Thirty days before setting foot on the premises, TP’s 22 team members underwent chemical mask fittings, background checks and drug testing. Additionally, they earned Kentucky Journeyman’s license certifications to prepare for working on the customer’s campus.  

TP’s team completed the manufacturer’s in-house safety course required for those working in a chemical plant. This one-hour course consisted of training on different emergency horn blasts and lights one may hear or see while working in the plant. Our team also participated in an odor test because chemical spills and the resulting smells can arise before the building sensors signal there was an incident. Lastly, they reviewed standard plant procedures, including confidentiality and cell phone use policies and the requirement for every person to have a partner while on the floor.

TP’s number one core value, “Safety First, Always First,” made this project possible. TP’s commitment to safety before, during and after the work made our team an ideal choice for a chemical manufacturer which values safety as much as we do. 

Replace versus Repair? TP’s Capital Assessments Guide Our Service Customers

TP’s service team is committed to helping our customers save money on costly equipment repairs and unnecessary replacements. For this reason, we have developed a unique capital assessment and planning program for our service customers. 

Our capital assessments are developed annually using equipment data paired with real repair costs tracked within our service software program. We use color coding methods to categorize equipment based on type, age and typical lifecycle. This data, coupled with the service logs, provides our customers with an educated projection of the equipment’s lifespan.  

Armed with this information, the TP service team advises customers on an annual basis on the most cost-effective options and guides budget planning for replacement or repairs for the coming year and beyond. 

While we cannot predict the exact day and time equipment will fail, our capital assessments provide customers with a comprehensive equipment overview so they can make informed decisions and save money. 

To learn more about our capital assessment and preventative maintenance services, contact a TP representative at 513-851-8881. 

A Culture of Safety

Safety is our number one priority at TP Mechanical. We recently hit another safety milestone having worked 7,000,000 safe man hours without a lost-time accident. Ask us how we continue to be an industry leader in safety, and the answer is simple: We start setting the foundation from day one.  

TP has made a commitment to eliminate injuries from everyday processes. Immediately after getting hired, all new employees, office and field, must complete the OSHA 10-hour training before new hire orientation. Once this is completed, we outline our policies and procedures, which go far beyond OSHA requirements, during our half-day orientation. Clearly outlining our expectations from the beginning empowers all members of our TP team–from the newest employee to our CEO–to put safety at the forefront of everything they do. 

Our President and CEO, Bill Riddle, models this commitment. When Bill walks a job site, employees are encouraged to ask him about safety; having held numerous roles at TP, Bill understands all aspects of the job and takes time to connect with those in the field and share the importance of Safety First, Always First.

Three Tips to Prevent Heat Stress and Heat-induced Illnesses on a Jobsite

Safety First, Always First.

With summer upon us and temperatures rising, it is important to understand the risk factors of heat stress and take precautions to avoid it and other heat-induced illnesses.

Heat stress generally occurs when spending long periods of time outside in excessive heat, and symptoms typically include physical exhaustion, cramping, rashes and dehydration. In the most severe cases, heat stroke may occur, which can result in confusion, irrational behavior, loss of consciousness and even death.

“Heat stress is certainly something we take seriously,” says Jamie Absher, Safety Specialist at TP Mechanical. “Our employees are outside on jobsites daily during the warmer months, and their health and safety is our foremost priority.”

There are a variety of factors that put anyone at a higher risk of experiencing heat stress, including:

  • High temperatures and humidity
  • Direct sun exposure
  • Not drinking enough fluids (dehydration)
  • Physical exertion
  • Limited air movement
  • Bulky or heavy personal protective equipment or clothing
  • Radiant heat sources (vehicle and equipment engines, hot manufacturing processes, etc.)
  • Certain medications (e.g., diuretics, antihypertensives and anticholinergics)
  • Physical conditioning and health conditions (e.g., diabetes, cardiovascular disease, influenza, etc.)
  • Lack of recent heat exposure (not acclimatized)
  • Age of 65 or higher

To mitigate the above risk factors and prevent heat stress, here are three strategies to employ on your jobsite:

  1. Implement a heat safety plan. It is important to train workers on the risk factors, symptoms and health effects of heat stress, as well has how to respond to a heat illness incident. Establishing someone as a heat safety leader on the jobsite to manage the heat safety plan and monitor workers is another way to be proactive. When possible, it is also beneficial to utilize modified work schedules to schedule more physically demanding and non-essential outdoor work during cooler times of the day.
  2. Stay hydrated. NIOSH recommends that for moderate activity in moderate conditions, each worker should drink one cup of water every 15 to 20 minutes. Keep fluids – especially water – readily available to workers on the jobsite. Employers should also consider providing urine color charts near toilet facilities so workers can monitor their hydration level throughout the day.
  3. Keep cool. Our bodies naturally produce heat, even during rest, so being sure to cool off during physical exertion is key to avoiding heat stress. Regular breaks should be taken in air conditioned or shaded, breezy areas. Avoiding non-essential bulky or heavy clothing and equipment can also reduce the risk for heat stress, and employers should consider providing cold packs or cooling vests to workers on particularly hot days.

To learn more about our commitment to workplace health and safety, visit http://www.tpmechanical.com/about-tp/safety/.

May is Food Allergy Action Month

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

A food allergy occurs when the body has a specific immune response to certain foods. Sometimes, the body’s response can be severe or life-threatening. Food allergies are a growing food safety and public health concern, according to the CDC. It is also estimated that between 4 and 6 percent of U.S. children are affected by some type of food allergy.

Among other things, Food Allergy Action Month was created to spread awareness about what food allergies are, how to recognize them and how to help someone who is having an allergic reaction. Common symptoms of an allergic reaction to food include the following:

• A tingling sensation in the mouth
• Swelling of the lips, tongue and throat
• Itching, hives and a rash throughout the body
• Cramping, diarrhea or vomiting
• Wheezing and difficulty breathing
• Dizziness or lightheadedness
• Loss of consciousness


Despite CDC Recommendation, Many Adults Still Refusing Shingles Vaccine

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

Shingles is an extremely common—and painful—viral infection, affecting 1 out of every 3 Americans at some point in their life. It’s caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox, so anyone who has had chickenpox is at risk of developing shingles. After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus remains dormant in the body. While scientists are unsure what causes the virus to awaken at a later date, they do know that the only way to reduce the risk of getting shingles is to get vaccinated.

Recommended Shingles Vaccine
The CDC recommends that adults use a new vaccine called Shingrix instead of Zostavax, which had been the recommended vaccine from 2006-2017. Shingrix provides strong protection against shingles and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), the most common shingles complication. In studies, two doses of Shingrix were found to be more than 90 percent effective at preventing shingles and PHN.

Who Should Get Vaccinated?
The CDC recommends that healthy adults 50 years and older get two doses of Shingrix, two to six months apart. People who have had shingles in the past, have received the Zostavax vaccine or are unsure if they have had chickenpox should also receive the Shingrix vaccine, according to CDC recommendations.

To find doctor’s offices or pharmacies near you that offer the vaccine, visit HealthMap Vaccine Finder.

Researchers Link New Danger to E-cigarettes

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

The use of electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes has grown exponentially in recent years—especially among young adults in the United States.

The liquid used in e-cigarettes contains nicotine and other harmful chemicals, including heavy metals and carcinogens. The liquid nicotine used in e-cigarettes comes in thousands of different flavors, many of which are appealing—and harmful—to teenagers.

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego found that popular fruity vape flavors appear to contain the highest levels of cancer-causing materials. The study recommends that parents warn teens of the dangers associated with e-cigarettes to discourage usage.

5 Healthy Snacks to Satisfy Your Workday Hunger

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

Snacking can be an important part of a healthy diet. Healthy snacks can provide midday energy boosts and fuel for exercising, and can help decrease your hunger and the odds of overeating at mealtime. Try incorporating these five simple snacks into your meal plan.

  1. Almonds—1.5 ounces of almonds (about 35 nuts) provides enough fiber, protein and good fats to keep you feeling full until your next me
  2. Greek yogurt parfait—1 cup of Greek yogurt with berries is a great way to get protein, calcium, fiber and antioxidants.
  3. Blueberries and mini Babybel cheese—1 cup of fresh blueberries has only 80 calories. When paired with two mini Babybel cheeses, you get a high dose of fiber, antioxidants, protein and calcium.
  4. Apple and ½ cup roasted chickpeas—Apples are fat-, sodium- and cholesterol-fr What’s more? One medium- sized apple has less than 100 calories. When paired with ½ cup roasted chickpeas, you get a snack that provides protein, and good fats and carbs.
  5. Veggies with hummus—Snacking on raw, fiber-rich vegetables during the day can help keep you full between meals. For extra protein, eat your veggies with hummus. Be sure to check the serving size on your hummus container to keep your portion size in check.

This article is intended for informational purposes only and is not intended to be exhaustive, nor should any discussion or opinions be construed as professional advice. Readers should contact a health professional for appropriate advice.

© 2018 Zywave, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

Do You Know the Signs of a Kidney Stone?

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

A recent study published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings journal found that the prevalence of kidney stones has increased more than fourfold in women and more than twofold in men over the past 30 years.

If treated in a timely fashion, kidney stones usually don’t cause permanent damage. Seek immediate medical attention if you experience any of the following:

  • Pain so severe that you can’t sit still or find a comfortable position
  • Pain accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fever or chills
  • Blood in your urine
  • Difficulty passing urine