Start Planning Today for a Stress-free Holiday Season

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

While the holiday season brings joy and togetherness, it can also bring stress for many individuals and families. Top holiday stressors include staying on a budget, managing multiple commitments and finding the perfect gift. Fortunately, by getting organized and planning out what you can ahead of time, you can help reduce your holiday stress.

  • Write down any known commitments. Does your child’s school have a holiday concert? Are you planning on hosting a holiday dinner? Making a list of your commitments will help you plan your time and help you avoid double-booking yourself.
  • Create your budget now. If you’re stressed about how your holiday spending will impact you after the holidays are over, you’re not alone. Remember, the sentiment of a gift is much more important than the cost. Set a realistic budget and do not go over it.
  • Start shopping early. Do you already know what you want to get some people on your list? Don’t be afraid to shop early. Sometimes, you can get great deals on presents even before the holiday season hits. Moreover, you can avoid the scenario of not being able to get the gift you want because it’s sold out.

Though these tips won’t prevent all of the holiday stress you may experience, they can definitely can help reduce it. If you experience high holiday stress, try these coping mechanisms to get your stress under control.

The People Behind TP Mechanical Introducing Adam Luensman

Adam has been with TP Mechanical 16 years, starting in our apprenticeship program and quickly working his way up to become a superintendent. Five years ago, Adam moved from the field to our service department, and currently serves as our Cincinnati Regional Sales Representative.

Adam works with our existing and new customers to support their needs when it comes to HVAC, Refrigeration, Fire Protection and Preventative Maintenance Agreements. He feels it is important to educate our customers on how to maintain and increase the longevity of their facility equipment, and thus reduce capital expenditures.

Adam stands out to customers and his team because his trustworthiness and consideration for the customers’ best interest.

Contact Adam at adam.luensman@tpmechanical.com or call him at 513-851-8881.

Licenses Held

  • Kentucky Boiler & HVAC
  • Plumbing: Cincinnati, Dayton, & Indianapolis
  • OSHA 10 Hour
  • OSHA 30 Hour
  • Member of Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce

Fight the Flu with These Simple Tips

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

The arrival of the fall and winter months signals many things, including the beginning of flu season. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, flu activity peaks between December and February.

Seasonal influenza can cause serious complications for people of any age, but children and the elderly are more vulnerable. To help keep your household healthy this flu season, consider the following suggestions:

  • Get the flu vaccine. Becoming vaccinated against the flu is the best chance of preventing the illness.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick and stay away from others when you feel under the weather.
  • Wash your hands often using soap and warm water to protect against germs.
  • Get plenty of sleep, stay physically active and drink plenty of water to keep your immune system strong.
  • Manage your stress and eat a nutritious diet rich in healthy grains, fruits, vegetables and fiber.

Sales & Business Development Spotlight Job of the Week

This week, our spotlight job of the week is our opening for a Sales & Business Development representative, located in our Indianapolis, Indiana region.

To learn more about this position and many more please visit our careers page www.tpmechanical.com/careers.

Time to Prepare Your Building for Winter

As we say goodbye to the summer heat, fall is an excellent time of year to review your building systems. Winter can create plenty of unexpected repair costs and emergencies, but a little bit of preventive maintenance and planning for potential system upgrades can go a long way in saving you future headaches.

Here are three routine checks to add to your building’s winter prep list:

Conduct a thorough inspection of all mechanical and plumbing systems.

Check that freeze stats are set at correct temperatures, freeze protection devices are receiving power and heating systems are properly operating. Verify the operation sequence of your chilled water cooling and hot water heating control valves is working correctly.

Look for ways to improve building energy efficiency.

Three common energy drains for buildings are poor insulation, malfunctioning units in semi-heated spaces, and poor or nonexistent system monitoring.

Replacing damaged and missing insulation or providing the proper insulation for your building and systems are critical to controlling your building’s environment and saving money on operating costs. Monitoring your facility’s temperature data to optimize system settings is crucial to maximizing your building’s efficiency.

Check roof and other drainage systems.

Time to clean out those gutters and drains. Snow and ice – even as they melt – can obstruct normal drainage paths. Obstructions
can cause damage and additional issues that can incur repair and service costs.

An autumn audit like this, with a focus on proactive and preventive actions, will help you identify and resolve problems before they are escalated to an emergency. They are critical to keeping your facility operating at peak efficiency.

To learn more about how our service team can assist you in your Fall Audit and how our preventive maintenance plans can serve you, visit www.tpmechanical.com/tp-service-group.

The People Behind TP Mechanical

THE PEOPLE BEHIND TP MECHANICAL

Introducing Matt Anderson, Business Development Leader – Commercial

While Matt is fairly new to TP Mechanical, he brings 20 years of sales and business development experience to the table. He is familiar with the major Ohio and Kentucky markets, having worked with architecture, engineering and construction contacts in the region for the past seven years.

Matt holds a B.A. in Business Administration from Thomas More College and has completed his OSHA 30-Hour safety training. To continue his education and extend his network, Matt attends a variety of events held by industry-specific organizations and trade associations, including the American Institute of Architects (AIA), American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), Allied Construction Industries (ACI) and Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC).

Matt prides himself on his collaborative work with general contractors, construction managers, architects and engineers to provide design assistance and realistic budgets, while developing and strengthening relationships that lead to greater project success and lasting partnerships.

Matt also assists in social media and newsletter content development to inform, educate and build relationships in the Kentucky, Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus markets.

Contact Matt at matt.anderson@tpmechanical.com or call him at 859-250-9777.

Key Safety Guidelines for Working in Confined Spaces

“Safety First, Always First.”

Utilizing proper safety guidelines while working in or around confined spaces on a jobsite is imperative to protecting our employees and clients.

OSHA defines a confined space as any place on a jobsite that has limited means of entry and/or exit, is large enough for a worker to enter it and is not intended for regular/continuous occupancy.

There are two types of confined spaces – non-permit-required and permit-required. A non-permit-required confined space does not contain atmospheric hazards or have the potential to contain any hazard capable of causing death or serious physical harm.

OSHA defines a permit-required space as having one or more of the following characteristics:

  • Contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere
  • Contains material that has the potential to engulf an entrant
  • Has walls that converge inward or floors that slope downward and taper into a smaller area that could trap or asphyxiate an entrant
  • Contains any other recognized safety or health hazard, such as unguarded machinery, exposed live wires or heat stress

According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, a total of 136 workers were killed in incidents associated with confined spaces in 2015.

“Our number one priority is the health and safety of our employees, clients, partners and the general public,” says Jamie Absher, Safety Specialist at TP Mechanical. “By doing things like participating in OSHA’s Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) and partnering with safety experts, we put ourselves in a position to prevent injuries like those that can be caused by working in confined spaces.”

Some of the key OSHA guidelines involving confined spaces:

  • Evaluate the workplace and clearly identify any permit-required confined spaces with the proper signage
  • Test atmospheric conditions before entry and purge, make inert, flush and/or continuously ventilate the permit space as necessary to eliminate or control atmospheric hazards
  • Provide, maintain and require the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) – including self-contained breathing apparatus and personal fall protection when appropriate – and any other equipment necessary for safe entry

For full guidelines, please refer to the OSHA Confined Space Standard, CFR 1910.146.

To learn more about our commitment to workplace health and safety, visit tpmechanical.com/about-tp/safety.