Shop for Seasonal Produce This Summer

Provided by HORAN | Presented by TP Mechanical

The U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion recommends that you consume at least two servings of fruit and three servings of vegetables each day. Although this varies by age, sex and level of physical activity, it is a good recommendation to live by to build a healthy dietary base.

One great way to add variety to your diet and to make sure you are eating enough fruits and vegetables is to look for seasonal produce. Additionally, choosing in-season produce can help save you money, as the abundance of the fruit or vegetable typically makes it less expensive.

This summer, be mindful of what fruits and vegetables are in season near you. Fruits & Veggies—More Matters, a health initiative focused on helping Americans increase fruit and vegetable consumption for better health, has made it easy to figure out which produce is in season. On its website, you can view year-round, winter, spring, summer and fall produce options.

Click here to see what’s in season this summer.

 

Fruit and Veggie Month is Here

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

September is fruit and veggie month, so now is the perfect time to examine your fruit and veggie intake. Most people are unsure of how many fruits and vegetables they should consume each day or are confused by specific serving sizes. How do you know whether you and your family are getting enough fruits and veggies?

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s MyPlate graphic is designed to help people choose the proper portion sizes for each food group at mealtimes. According to MyPlate guidelines, you should fill up half of your plate with fruits and vegetables at each meal. Making fruits and veggies the focal point of your plate will ensure that you and your family are eating healthier and consuming as many fruits and veggies as possible each day.

Shop the Farmers Market

 

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

Nothing is more frustrating than fruit or veggies going bad before you are able to eat them. Produce purchased in supermarkets is usually harvested long before it is found on grocery store shelves; in fact, it is estimated that produce travels an average of 1,500 miles from its source before reaching our homes. Because of this, many fruits and vegetables aren’t at peak freshness and need to be eaten within a few days of purchase. Your local farmers market can help bridge the gap from farm to table.

There are several benefits to buying locally sourced food: you support local farmers, you can buy in-season produce and your perishable food items will last much longer because they come fresh from the farm. During the summer months, farmers markets offer a rainbow of delicious and healthy options to choose from; sweet corn, bell peppers and eggplant are all in season during the summer months and can most likely be found in plentiful supply at your local farmers market.

There is often such a variety at farmers markets that you can always find something you’ve never tried before. Aren’t sure how to prepare your newly discovered fruits and veggies? Just ask! Many vendors are passionate about the food they produce and are often more than happy to offer preparation tips and tasty recipes for you to try.

Farmers markets aren’t just for produce. You can also find locally sourced eggs, meat, jams and baked goods at farmers markets. Flowers, crafts and jewelry are popular items as well. In addition, farmers markets are a great way to connect with your community; you can get to know your local farmers, catch up with friends and spend time with your family.

Now that summer is here, check out your local farmers market. Buying local is a great way for you to eat healthier and save money.

Heat Protection on the Job

Heat spells ‘hazard on the job’ for workers in the summertime. With the warmer weather moving into our area, the risks for heat-related illnesses increase, especially for workers exposed to humid conditions while wearing bulky protective clothing.

So, how do you stay cool during the warmest months of the year? Would you know the signs if heat exhaustion suddenly hit?

Hydration is Key

The absolute best way to avoid the threat of heat-related illness while working is to stay hydrated. Water is still the go-to drink in extreme heat. As for the amount of water that you will need to stay hydrated, new research suggests we should go beyond the traditional 8 glasses per day rule. Recent studies are saying that on average, adult males need about 3.7 liters of fluids per day (nearly 16 cups), while ladies need roughly 2.7 liters (or 11 cups) per day.

5 nutrition textures (fruits and vegetables isolated on white)There are other food options for helping you stay hydrated, including:

  • Fruits & vegetables
  • Sports drinks
  • Smoothies

What to Wear?

OHSA advises workers to wear light, loose-fitting clothing while working in extreme heat. Tightly-woven clothing works best for blocking out light, and the fabric should contain as much cotton as possible.

You should also be wearing sunscreen to block harmful sun rays. A sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 blocks 93 percent of UV rays.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for extreme temperatures can include a vented hard hat with UV protection, reflective clothing, body-cooling vests, and water-cooled garments. Workers should also be aware that some equipment can actually increase the risk of heat stress.

Knowing the Signs

Signs of heat exhaustion include disorientation, stumbling, slurred speech and unresponsiveness.

Other symptoms include:

  • Muscle cramps
  • Heat rash
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Severe thirst

 

TP Mechanical puts Safety First, Always First. Read more about TP Mechanical’s commitment to Safety.