New Guidelines—Cholesterol Is Not So Bad

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

Tablet with the chemical formula of cholesterol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the last several decades, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, provided by the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Agriculture (USDA), have warned against over consumption of cholesterol. Dietary recommendations suggested that adults consume no more than 300 milligrams of cholesterol a day (to put that into perspective, one egg yolk contains 186 milligrams of cholesterol).

However, after its review of current scientific evidence regarding nutrition, diet and health, the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee has removed the strict warnings on cholesterol intake. You can now eat your egg yolks guilt-free.

Although recommendations for cholesterol have eased, the new dietary guidelines target salt, sugar and saturated fat with suggestions for strictly limited intake.

Keep Your Heart Healthy

Presented by TP Mechanical | Provided by HORAN

This time of year, with Valentine’s Day just passing, you might associate hearts with romance and red roses. But there are two kinds of hearts—in addition to hosting Valentine’s Day, February also serves as Heart Health Month. Take some time this month to think about the blood-pumping kind of heart and what you can do to keep yours healthy.

bigstock-Heart-health-16855943Risk factors for heart disease include related health conditions, unhealthy behaviors and hereditary factors. Health conditions that can increase your chances of heart disease include high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. Cigarette smoking and tobacco use, poor diet, physical inactivity and excessive alcohol consumption are some behaviors that can adversely affect your heart health. Also, for some people, family health history can predict your risk of heart disease.

While you can’t change bad genes or eliminate all risks, there are a few choices you can make to lessen your susceptibility to heart disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), you can engage in a few simple preventive measures to help ward off heart problems.

  • Eat at least five servings of fruit and vegetables every day. Whole grains and low-fat dairy are also good for you.
  • Reduce your consumption of foods high in fat, cholesterol and salt.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Even if you’re busy, try to include at least 30 minutes of moderately intense exercise, such as biking or shoveling snow, into your daily routine.
  • Monitor your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and, if you have diabetes, manage it as recommended by your doctor.
  • Don’t start smoking, or, if you already smoke, consider quitting.
  • Recognize the signs of a heart attack, and call 911 immediately if you think that you or someone else is suffering a heart attack. The symptoms of a heart attack typically include the following:
  • Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck or back
  • Feeling weak, lightheaded or faint
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Pain or discomfort in arms or shoulder
  • Shortness of breath

When you know the risks of heart disease and the symptoms of a heart attack, you can help protect your heart for you and your loved ones.